Early career

In case you blinked, here’s a review of the 2-day, action-packed, breakneck-paced, 1st ever National CSC Student and Early Career Training

Last week, I attended the National CSC Student and Early Career Training held at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and left feeling inspired, empowered, and with many new friends. From November 2-3rd, students, postdocs, and professionals from the Department of the Interior’s National Climate Science Centers came together to share research, learn from one another, and improve our skills as collaborators and science communicators.

Nov 8, 2016
Andrew Battles

A Leg Up on Applying for the NSF GRFP

After working outside of academia for eight years I decided to earn a graduate degree. In my first year back to school I was encouraged to apply for the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP). The GRFP is a prestigious award for graduate students providing a stipend and cost of education funds for three years. Practically speaking, it enables students to focus on research instead of how to pay their bills.

Sep 12, 2016
Kristen Emmett

SCCSC offers online class on climate change management

Earlier this year, I wrote an ECCF blog about a fall semester undergraduate class at the University of Oklahoma (OU) that taught students about climate science, the impacts of climate change, and that gave them a look behind the scenes of the climate negotiations at the Paris COP21 meeting last December. Well, I’m happy to report that this fall this class is back — and it’s gotten even better.

Aug 1, 2016
Toni Klemm

From scarcity to inclusion: The continued need for women in science

As March comes to a close, we have once again celebrated the many contributions of women to society. For many of us conducting research at the Climate Science Centers and partner institutions, women who have made tremendous strides in our various scientific fields like Marie Curie, Rachel Carson and Jane Goodall, come to mind.

Mar 28, 2016
Meaghan Guckian and Toni Lyn Morelli

The Importance of Philosophy in Responding to Climate Change

When I tell people that my undergraduate majors were environmental studies and philosophy, they usually respond with a confused look and a comment like, “Hmm, those are very different topics!” Of course, science and philosophy are fundamentally different in the questions they ask and in how they answer those questions. But that doesn’t mean they aren’t related in critically important ways. To me, the relationship between the environmental sciences and philosophy has always been a natural and necessary one.

Feb 16, 2016
Jessica Blackband

AGU 2015: Big Meeting Energy, Small Meeting Feel

Most folks know that I’m not usually a huge fan of big meetings.  They have great energy, but there’s so much going on that you can’t see or do everything you want to.  So I have to admit that as a first time attendee to the largest Earth and space science meeting in the world, I had some mixed feelings about going.

Jan 11, 2016
Adrienne Wootten

Navigating Science and Advocacy

In a recent article, NASA Climate Scientist Gavin Schmidt explained that every scientist is an advocate, and asks provocatively what should we advocate for? The answer, all successful scientists must advocate for the use of resources to support their research, many of us through formal proposals to government agencies. We advocate on behalf of our students, colleagues, and programs in our universities, laboratories, or companies.

Dec 14, 2015
Scott Denning

Thinking on glacial scales: Lessons learned from the NW CSC Boot Camp

Standing near the Nisqually glacier, listening to National Park Service geomorphologist Paul Kennard and geologist Scott Beason discuss the impacts of climate change on Mt. Rainier glaciers, I felt the effects of climate change in a deeply profound and different way. I had known glaciers were retreating, but hadn’t realized that this process had been underway since at least before the 1970s. Nor did I know just how much glaciers had suffered in the Pacific Northwest this past year from unusually warm temperatures.

Nov 30, 2015
Diana Gergel