data

We have these climate projections - now how do we use them?

On getting climate model projections in the hand of managers. 

In the past several decades, climate scientists have developed robust models that simulate past climate conditions and provide meaningful projections for the future. In the past several years, researchers have developed downscaled climate projections that provide the kind of local guidance resource managers have been demanding. And now all those managers are making climate-informed decisions.

Jan 8, 2017
Ryan Boyles

Making Better Posters

On November 2nd and 3rd, the first ever National CSC Student and Early Career Training will be held at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. This blog post is the first in a series highlighting the goals, featured sessions, and experiences from this meeting, but for now here are some tips for preparing and improving your conference poster. Part of the two-day training will be a Poster Session to show off your reseach and help practice your communication skills.

Oct 11, 2016
Toni Klemm

High Stakes for our High Peaks: Working to Conserve Montane Birds of the Northern Forest in the Face of Climate Change

While the mountains of the Northeast may not be the tallest nor the most remote compared to others within North America, they contribute just as much to the natural and cultural value of the surrounding landscape as any other. Stretching from the Catskills and Adirondacks of New York to the Greens of Vermont, Whites of New Hampshire, and all the way up to Katahdin in Maine, the mountains of the Northern Forest are a formidable and irreplaceable feature of the Northeastern landscape.

Jul 18, 2016
Timothy Duclos

LiDAR Applications for Sea Level Rise Mapping

Have you ever wondered how we know what coastal sea rise is going to look like at the end of the century? Climate change and sea level rise are strongly connected and pose a threat especially for coastal cities and ecosystems, for example, including in the Florida Keys. The inhabitants of Key West are losing ground quickly and remote sensing can help us visualize what the future holds as the seas rise. Urban planners, policymakers and homeowners can then use that information to make more informed decisions about how to respond and prepare for rising seas.

Jun 6, 2016
Benjamin Ignac and Emily Campbell

6 Tips for Designing and Conducting an Online Survey

Online surveys are everywhere these days, and with free tools like SurveyMonkey or Google Forms, anyone can conduct a survey. Preparing and conducting a survey for research, however, is no small endeavor and requires careful preparation and consideration. Here are 6 tips for how to get the most out of your efforts.

May 9, 2016
Toni Klemm

Downscaled to an estuary: Making it easier on climate data users

There is a lot of data out there. It seems like every agency has produced their own downscaled dataset using different methods, training data, and a hodge-podge of global climate models. They are all unique, but none of them are the “best.” This blog post will not give you tips in working downscaled data or picking what is right for your project; my colleague already wrote that post awhile back.

Apr 4, 2016
Geneva Gray

Scaled to Size: Downscaling Climate Models in Hawaiʻi

From a scientific standpoint, Hawaiʻi is a unique location for climate science in the Pacific Island Region. Since climate change is already impacting island nations throughout the region, you could call them the ‘canaries in the coal mines’ that serve as a warning to other areas.

Jan 21, 2016
Lauren R. Kaiser

The Small Stuff Matters

There have been several times so far in my short graduate career where I have ended up arguing with one professor or another over something few would think of.  How much does the small stuff matter?  That is, how much does a small change in methods in research matter?  Let me take a moment to talk about why I think that (at least in the context of climate modeling), the small stuff is very important.

Mar 21, 2016
Adrienne Wootten

The Invisible Elephant in the Room

A few weeks ago I had the opportunity to speak with Dr. Peter Thorne when he visited the Southeast CSC and the NCSU Department of Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences.  Dr. Thorne is one of the lead authors of Chapter 2 of the National Climate Assessment (“Our Changing Climate”) and a lead section author for the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report.  During his time visiting with us, Dr.

Mar 7, 2016
Adrienne Wootten